The Danger of Small Teeny-Tiny Samples

Miguel Tejada’s teammates once accused him of tipping pitches to fellow Dominicans. The evidence?

The Times said certain players started to wonder when in May 2001, Tejada and his close friend Tony Batista — then with the Blue Jays — each had a terrific three-game series. Batista was 6-for-13 with a home run and five RBIs, while Tejada was 4-for-10 with nine RBIs, including a home run in each game.


NY Times Table

The failure to understand that events occur randomly is a failure to understand causality.

2 Responses “The Danger of Small Teeny-Tiny Samples”

  1. You must have never had the pleasure of watching Tony Batista hit. Six hits in three games is immediately suspicious, and I love math.

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  1. [...] The danger of tiny samples: “The failure to understand that events occur randomly is a failure to understand causality”.  Couldn’t have said it better myself. [...]