Comments on: On Other Methods for Estimating Aging http://www.sabernomics.com/sabernomics/index.php/2009/11/on-other-methods-for-estimating-aging/ Economic Thinking about Baseball Sun, 09 Jan 2011 17:16:18 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6 By: Yaramah http://www.sabernomics.com/sabernomics/index.php/2009/11/on-other-methods-for-estimating-aging/comment-page-1/#comment-106995 Wed, 25 Nov 2009 00:58:27 +0000 http://www.sabernomics.com/sabernomics/?p=2180#comment-106995 Just out of curiosity, is there any evidence from your study or others that PED had any effect on performance as it related to aging? I thought one of the purported effects of PED was that it allowed you to maintain your highest level of performance for longer, and it allowed you to overcome niggling injuries that effected other players. Just curious if the data set from the 90’s and beyond is any different to those from earlier eras.

]]>
By: JC http://www.sabernomics.com/sabernomics/index.php/2009/11/on-other-methods-for-estimating-aging/comment-page-1/#comment-106978 Sun, 22 Nov 2009 13:54:43 +0000 http://www.sabernomics.com/sabernomics/?p=2180#comment-106978 I don’t need the spreadsheet. My study is on 86 years of data—also breaking the sample into eras—which normalizes performance and controls for many other factors. I don’t find what you’ve presented to be compelling evidence for me to abandon my findings as mistaken.

The paper wasn’t about fielding aging, and even if that was at issue, I’m not sure what you did says much.
On attrition, I removed the sample restrictions and found that the peak did not change.

]]>
By: Colin Wyers http://www.sabernomics.com/sabernomics/index.php/2009/11/on-other-methods-for-estimating-aging/comment-page-1/#comment-106976 Sun, 22 Nov 2009 03:03:32 +0000 http://www.sabernomics.com/sabernomics/?p=2180#comment-106976 I reran the query on “normalized” OPS, which is OPS divided by the league average that year and multiplied by the average OPS from 1995 to 2008. Instead of finding a dropoff of .006 points, I found a dropoff of .007 points. If you are interested, I can share with you both the results (in an Excel spreadsheet) as well as the SQL code I used to pull the data from the Baseball Databank.

Also, you have yet to address the other points, about position changing and attrition rates.

]]>
By: Colin Wyers http://www.sabernomics.com/sabernomics/index.php/2009/11/on-other-methods-for-estimating-aging/comment-page-1/#comment-106953 Thu, 19 Nov 2009 20:37:05 +0000 http://www.sabernomics.com/sabernomics/?p=2180#comment-106953 I am working on a revised set of figures that includes an accounting for average yearly OPS. (I may also throw in some park factors and present both analysis.)

I do want to quibble with the characterization of the samples presented as “cherry-picked.” The 2007-to-2009 sample was picked because it was the only data I had in the modern era that wasn’t included in your study – the idea being to test the estimates on out-of-sample data. I hope to have 2009 data added to my database this weekend, and I can add that as well. The other sample was picked because it covered the years I had a full position breakdown handy for, in order to present the position-switch data along with the hitting data.

]]>